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Aimee Isaac of Rehoboth takes part in national Alzheimer’s advocacy forum

May 2, 2019

Advocates from the Alzheimer’s Association Delaware Valley Chapter joined at least 1,200 others from around the country March 31-April 2 in Washington, D.C., for the annual Alzheimer's Association AIM Advocacy Forum. 

The event raises awareness and increases legislative support for policies to improve the lives of 5.8 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease. As many as 26,000 Delawareans are living with Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia. 

Advocates gathered on Capitol Hill April 2 to meet with their members of Congress to discuss the real-life impact of legislative policies focused on providing researchers, healthcare professionals, caregivers and individuals with the educational tools and resources necessary to combat Alzheimer’s disease. They urged the Congress members to support $350 million in federal funding for Alzheimer’s research at the National Institutes of Health

“They respect and understand our stories. By meeting with us each year, their commitment to support funding for NIH and for important legislation is renewed,” said Aimee Isaac of Rehoboth Beach. 

Isaac lost her father in 2018 to younger-onset Alzheimer's and Lewy Body Dementia. “The forum is a place to connect with others who are living with Alzheimer's or other dementias in some way,” she said. “These connections help to chip away at the isolation that results from being a caregiver.” 

“It was gratifying to see so many people from our area who are dedicated to our cause and eager to meet with the legislators who represent them to talk about how their support could potentially help us end Alzheimer’s disease,” said Katie Macklin, Alzheimer’s Association Delaware Valley Chapter senior director of advocacy.

More information about the Alzheimer’s Association AIM Advocacy Forum is available at www.alz.org/forum. The Delaware Valley Chapter’s Sussex County Branch Office is at 108 N. Bedford St., Georgetown. Go to www.alz.org/delval, or call the 24/7 toll-free Helpline, 800-272-3900.